“And when the yoke from without began to be lifted, and the spirit breathed more freely, one of eminently illustrious personality came upon the scene and influenced Jewish life to the present day. His freer intellectual development, indeed, owed much to the influence of forces extraneous to Judaism… In his personal life and practice an observant Jew, he showed his brethren throughout the world that a man could be strictly religious and yet enjoy the eminence and lustre of a German Plato. It was this ‘and yet’ which proved decisive. His successors contented themselves with the zealous cultivation of Tenakh on philological and aesthetic lines… to the neglect of Judaism itself.”

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, Nineteen Letters, p. 30

“[T]he adherents of Jewish liberalism… traced the origin of the Reform Movement to [Moses Mendelssohn]. Mendelssohn’s writings, however, in which every word of the Jewish text is declared to be divine wisdom, prove the error of this thesis.”

Hermann Schwab, The History of Orthodox Jewry in Germany, Ch. II

The Path of the Just (מסילת ישרים), Ch. 24:

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We have already found that the great transcendent angels tremble and shudder constantly before the awesomeness of the Eternal, to such a degree that our Sages of blessed memory have said in a wise allegory (Chagigah 13B): ‘From where does the [Heavenly] River of Fire originate? From the sweat of the holy creatures [who serve the Eternal].’ And this is because of their awe of the exaltedness of the Blessed One that is constantly upon them, lest they detract, even if only in a small way, from the glory and sanctity that befits Him.

All of our wisdom is like naught —  for our greatest of sages cannot be regarded as anything other than a disciple of the disciples of former generations… Rather, we must recognize that our understanding is superficial, that our minds are extremely weak, that ignorance is widespread among us, that error is multiplying, and that the knowledge that we do possess is miniscule.”

Rabbi Moshe Chayim Luzzato, The Path of the Just, Ch. 22

The matter of the controversy between the Academy of Hillel and the Academy of Shamai was a difficult matter for Israel, because of the great controversy that persisted between them. Ultimately, it was concluded that the halachah (law) would follow the opinion of the Academy of Hillel always. Therefore, that this conclusion should remain in full force forever and ever, and should not weaken under any circumstances, is the upkeep of the Torah, so that the Torah should not be made into two separate Torahs. Therefore… it is more pious to hold like the Academy of Hillel, even when this constitutes a leniency, rather than to act stringently like the Academy of Shamai. This principle should be as eyes for us to see upon which path dwells the light in truth and faithfulness to do that which is right in the eyes of God.”

Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato, The Path of the Just, Ch. 20

The virtue of piety also requires that one should not cause any creature to suffer, even animals, and should show mercy and compassion toward them. Similarly, it says (Proverbs 12:10): ‘The righteous man knows the soul of his beast.’ And there are those who are of the opinion that ‘causing an animal to suffer is a prohibition of the Torah’ (Shabbos 128B). And at the very least it is a Rabbinic enactment.

-Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto, The Path of the Just, Ch. 19

When each letter of ‘wisdom’ (חכמה) is spelled out — ‘chet’ (חי”ת), ‘kaf’ (כ”ף), ‘mem’ (מ”ם), ‘hey’ (ה”י) — the numerical value is 613 (the number of commandments in the Torah). An allusion to this is in the statement (from Avot): “Who is wise? He who sees that which will be born,” i.e. [the value of] the hidden letters (with which the revealed letters are ‘pregnant’).

(Shla”h, Masechet Yoma)